copperbadge:

persinetteinthetower:

moriartythetease:

So what happens if two people who have promised their firstborn to separate witches have a child together? Do they both just pop up in the nursery and have a custody battle?

I need a book about a little girl whose parents had promised their firstborn to different witches and the only way that both ends of the deal were fulfilled was for them to have joint custody of the child.

I love it!

And then the witches, forced to share a cottage while raising their joint stolen child, fall in love…

Celebrities take part in the Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness for ALS. (Part 1)

meagan tandy pouring a bucket of money over her head like a boss

durinssons:

get to know me meme 
favourite tv shows [1/5]: pushing daisies

"Well, who died instead?"
"It’s a random proximity thing."
"Bitch, I was in proximity!"

eeames:

cast our fevers in stone by nagia {}

"No, no, there is definitely no burying any of my anything in anything of Derek’s, thank you, Erica, can we please stop talking about—"

thingsfortwwings:

[Image: Miles Morales swinging from some webbing; he’s holding Kamala Khan, who is grinning, her arms around Miles’ neck.]
sirdef:

Kamala & Miles palette meme commissioned by tofillaprompt!! 

thingsfortwwings:

[Image: Miles Morales swinging from some webbing; he’s holding Kamala Khan, who is grinning, her arms around Miles’ neck.]

sirdef:

Kamala & Miles palette meme commissioned by tofillaprompt!! 

Kristen Stewart in ‘Just One Of The Guys’ by Jenny Lewis (x)

(Source: stewarter)

Crystal Reed as Kate Bishop

(Source: hardykoi)

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.
One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.
However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.
All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:






Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:


I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this specific video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.

One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.

However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.

All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:

Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:

I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this specific video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

karlimeaghan:

I love these shows, but by God they have a lot of problems.

stiles stilinski in text posts. 
inspired by ( x )

(Source: changemeback)